Poverty Solutions

  1. Majority of Detroiters say they’re unlikely to get COVID-19 vaccine, U-M survey says

    DMACS shows roughly 69% of Detroiters currently view the pandemic as very serious for themselves personally and their community. Previous waves of the survey found nearly all Detroiters are wearing masks, with the latest survey showing 98% of residents wear masks some or all of the time while doing activities outside their homes.

  2. New U-M report lifts up Detroit residents’ priorities for economic mobility

    Residents want living-wage jobs, good schools, affordable housing, accessible health care, and other foundations of economic well-being.

  3. Detroit unemployment rate drops, but 1 in 5 residents in financial trouble

    Survey responses indicate Detroit’s unemployment rate dropped from 48% in May and June to 38% in late July. One-quarter of Detroiters in the labor force say they remain unemployed due to layoffs and business closures resulting from the pandemic.

  4. Detroit housing shortage, evictions set stage for COVID-19 housing crisis

    Failing to ensure more Detroiters can stay in their homes will increase the likelihood of a resurgence of COVID-19 in the city and surrounding areas, as having a stable place to live is critical to social distancing.

  5. Michigan poverty map shows economic security by county

    People living in poverty and the working poor will have an especially difficult time weathering the global pandemic, which is taking a toll on people’s economic security and health, said H. Luke Shaefer, director of Poverty Solutions.

  6. U-M survey: 1 in 5 Detroiters will be out of money in 3 months because of COVID-19

    The survey found Detroiters are most concerned about being able to care for family and friends and getting the health care they need during the coronavirus pandemic, even more so than having a place to live and access to transportation. 

  7. A new guide helps Detroit homeowners with home repair resources

    Despite the efforts of local government and nonprofits in the home repair ecosystem, Poverty Solutions’ research found there are simply not enough resources available to meet demand in Detroit.

  8. Q&A: Alexa Eisenberg focuses on making housing policy better

    “Perhaps more importantly, health and housing work in Detroit is ultimately racial justice work. I grew up in the suburbs of Detroit, and what I do is motivated by the overt and disturbing inequities that exist in the Detroit metropolitan region… I hope that my work can bring some material benefit to the people of Detroit.”
    ~ Alexa Eisenberg

  9. Grant program supports community-academic poverty research

    Can grocery delivery improve the health of pregnant women? Are neighborhood entrepreneurship programs increasing economic mobility for low-income Detroiters? What role could a modern greenhouse play in expanding the ancient African art of bead-making in Detroit? These are research questions three teams of community and academic partners will tackle this year with support from the Detroit Urban Research Center and Poverty Solutions at the University of Michigan.