School for Environment and Sustainability

  1. Visible from outer space, Detroit’s unofficial pathways could play important role in land redevelopment

    “When traveling in Detroit, doing work on urban gardens, I was struck by all the footpaths,” said Joshua Newell, associate professor at U-M’s School for Environment and Sustainability and in the Program in the Environment. “There is so much vacant land, we are not going to be able to develop or simply enclose all of it … so why not think about reaffirming and formalizing how people are already using these spaces?”

  2. U-M offers Fall ’19 courses with a Detroit spin on social innovation, car culture and more

    Interested in urban issues? Here’s a list of courses offered at the University of Michigan this fall through the College of Literature, Sciences and the Arts, the Law School, the Ford School of Public Policy, the School for Environment and Sustainability, the Ross School of Business, and the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning.

  3. U-M study reveals hot spots of environmental injustice across Michigan

    A new study by a University of Michigan student team has identified “hot spots” of environmental injustice across the state. U.S. census tracts in Detroit, Grand Rapids, Flint, Saginaw, Lansing and Kalamazoo are among the hot spots identified in the study, which was released today.

  4. Detroit’s expansive urban vegetation studied via satellite

    University of Michigan researchers are monitoring Detroit’s vegetation from space to understand its connection to urban decline — and gaining insights into a public health threat emanating from the city’s vacant lots.

  5. Bumblebee populations higher in Detroit than in some less-urbanized areas; vacant lots could be a factor

    A new study of native bumblebee populations in southeastern Michigan cities found, surprisingly, that Detroit has more of the large-bodied bees than some surrounding, less urbanized locations.

  6. Very young lake sturgeon and artificial spawning reefs in the Detroit and St. Clair rivers

    A study of the St. Clair River by U-M scientists shows that despite river-current speeds of more than 3 feet per second, some recently hatched lake sturgeon manage to remain in the St. Clair’s North Channel, a surprising finding with implications for the siting of future spawning reefs.