School of Social Work

  1. Community in crisis: Black churches expand services

    The U-M School of Social Work partnered with Williams on his COVID-19 relief efforts. Early on, the school routed social work students to assist with food and supply, packing and delivery, logistics and administrative support.

  2. U-M grad student awarded anti-racism grant to support Detroit’s Zone 8

    The project focuses on Zone 8, a predominantly Black neighborhood in Detroit, which takes its name from its zip code. Zone 8 experiences many of the inequalities that ravaged all of Detroit in the past decades — unemployment, addiction, persistent poverty, lack of affordable housing — in hyper-focused ways.

  3. U-M awarded grant to support Detroit entrepreneurs in bridging digital divide

    The project builds on Tawanna Dillahunt and Julie Hui’s partnership with the Friends of Parkside to pilot a “community tech worker” program to assist seniors requiring technology-related support. Tech workers will be embedded at Jefferson East to develop a sustainable, useful model that will help bridge the digital divide for small businesses. 

  4. Historic King Solomon Baptist Church: responding to a community in crisis

    As a new pastor Charles Williams III made sure to connect Historic King Solomon Baptist Church to its social service roots. He established a food pantry at the church, clothing giveaways, Thanksgiving meals and youth mentoring services. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit Michigan in March 2020, Williams was ready to do more.

  5. Faculty Q&A: Trina Shanks on how to improve family well-being in Detroit

    “There are at least opportunities to meet one another, collaborate with one another, advise larger groups of people who are doing engagement, and who are working in Detroit, and who are thinking about working in Detroit. It doesn’t have to be everybody starting from scratch completely every time. It’s not perfect yet but it’s better than it was, and I think people are communicating.”
    ~ Trina Shanks, social work professor

  6. Virtual discussions focus on equity issues in Detroit

    Hosted by Ayesha Ghazi Edwin, ENGAGE Program Manager and adjunct lecturer, the discussions focus on equity issues in Detroit and movements for social change in the city. They are free and open to the public and have featured speakers including thought leader and scholar Tawana Petty; Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib; lawyer and activist Deepa Iyer, among other prominent activists, scholars, and community leaders. 

  7. Virtual senior center helps older adults in Detroit connect while social distancing

    The classes are offered by the Silver Center, a virtual senior center that offers enrichment and educational programs via phone to help adults 60 years old or older stay connected. While the program started before the pandemic, organizers hope it will mitigate some of the negative health and social impacts caused by social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic. 

  8. U-M alumna Amy Good offers Alternatives For Girls in crisis, homeless or at-risk for abuse

    Amy Good’s work with Alternatives For Girls was inspired by a challenge she received from professor emerita Rosemary Sarri as she neared graduation from U-M’s School of Social Work. “She said, ‘Do something hard, and build something that wasn’t there before,” Good said. 

  9. Alternatives For Girls launched in ’87 with no blueprint, continues to thrive

    As Amy Good neared graduation from the University of Michigan’s School of Social Work, Professor Rosemary Saari gave her a challenge. “She said, ‘Do something hard, and build something that wasn’t there before,” Good says.