1. U-M architecture professor Doug Kelbaugh brings passion to sustainable design

    “I think it’s also the first book to overtly state that cities are our last best chance in the war against climate change. People who live in cities have smaller carbon footprints, and that’s largely due to walkability, transit, and shared dwelling units that share walls and infrastructure.”

  2. U-M study reveals hot spots of environmental injustice across Michigan

    A new study by a University of Michigan student team has identified “hot spots” of environmental injustice across the state. U.S. census tracts in Detroit, Grand Rapids, Flint, Saginaw, Lansing and Kalamazoo are among the hot spots identified in the study, which was released today.

  3. U-M report details phosphorus sources—both urban and agricultural—in Detroit River watershed

    A new University of Michigan report provides the most detailed characterization to date of the phosphorus sources—and their relative contributions—in the complex Detroit River watershed, which is heavily urbanized on the U.S. side of the border and mainly agricultural on the Canadian side.

  4. The fight against Detroit’s controversial waste incinerator hits home for Ahmina Maxey

    Ahmina Maxey was shocked when the incinerator closed in late March. “It was so abrupt,” she said. “The incinerator (owner) has the best poker face I’ve ever seen because… they were pretending it was going to be open for 20 more years.”

  5. Reducing phosphorus entering the Detroit River; real-time, autonomous stormwater control

    In 2015, U-M researchers at the Graham Sustainability Institute were awarded a $3 million grant from the Erb Family Foundation to determine the relative contributions of various phosphorus sources, both urban and agricultural, in the Detroit River watershed.

  6. Bumblebee populations higher in Detroit than in some less-urbanized areas; vacant lots could be a factor

    A new study of native bumblebee populations in southeastern Michigan cities found, surprisingly, that Detroit has more of the large-bodied bees than some surrounding, less urbanized locations.

  7. Very young lake sturgeon and artificial spawning reefs in the Detroit and St. Clair rivers

    A study of the St. Clair River by U-M scientists shows that despite river-current speeds of more than 3 feet per second, some recently hatched lake sturgeon manage to remain in the St. Clair’s North Channel, a surprising finding with implications for the siting of future spawning reefs.

  8. Studying Detroit River Phosphorus

    Researchers at the University of Michigan Water Center were awarded a $3 million grant from the Erb Family Foundation to determine the Detroit River’s contributions to algae blooms that plague Lake Erie each summer.

  9. Turning Vacant Land into Productive Green Spaces

    Alleys, vacant lots and underutilized urban spaces hold great potential for fostering more sustainable cities.