Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning

  1. Pewabic Pottery co-founder established first ceramic arts studio at U-M

    The late Mary Chase Perry Stratton founded Pewabic Pottery in 1903. Her legacy, like her influence, remains a force. She received a prestigious honorary Master of Arts degree in 1930, established the first ceramic arts studio at the University of Michigan during World War II, helped built its art museum’s collection and penned a ceramics text that is still in use by artists today, cementing her reputation as an innovator and, interestingly, as a teacher. 

  2. U-M architecture professor Doug Kelbaugh brings passion to sustainable design

    “I think it’s also the first book to overtly state that cities are our last best chance in the war against climate change. People who live in cities have smaller carbon footprints, and that’s largely due to walkability, transit, and shared dwelling units that share walls and infrastructure.”

  3. U-M offers Fall ’19 courses with a Detroit spin on social innovation, car culture and more

    Interested in urban issues? Here’s a list of courses offered at the University of Michigan this fall through the College of Literature, Sciences and the Arts, the Law School, the Ford School of Public Policy, the School for Environment and Sustainability, the Ross School of Business, and the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning.

  4. U-M faculty win international design competition to reimagine Detroit’s arts and cultural district

    Three University of Michigan faculty members are part of a team who won an international design competition that will unite 12 cultural and educational institutions located in Detroit’s Midtown and change the way visitors and Detroiters experience the area.

  5. Q&A: John Marshall talks about making technology equitable as part of Detroit Square project

    “I mean, I think if we’re honest, we originally thought we could, at the least, change the nature of the conversation by putting our ideas on the table. And then we got through to the final three, and then we were selected as winners—and I’m just really proud that all the stakeholders appreciated our knowledge and perspective and trust us to carry it through.”

  6. June Manning Thomas’ life’s work in Detroit started with a single, vacant lot

    June Manning Thomas is Centennial Professor of Urban Planning and Regional Development at University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning today, but in the early 1990s her niece was living next to an overgrown lot in Detroit. That vacant plot got her thinking and asking questions: How had that land gone undeveloped for so long? Who had failed her niece and other black Detroiters?

  7. Michigan Minds Podcast: Building momentum for residential redevelopment in Detroit

    Kimberly Dowdell, a lecturer at U-M’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, decided to become an architect at a young age in an effort to repair Detroit’s disinvested building stock. Her firm, Century Partners, redevelops single-family homes in Detroit with an eye toward stabilizing and revitalizing residential neighborhoods.

  8. Semester in Detroit program celebrates a decade of meaningful engagement

    Over twelve years ago, University of Michigan undergraduate Rachael Tanner asked herself a simple question: Why doesn’t U-M provide substantive opportunities for students to engage with Detroit?  Her urban studies professor, Stephen Ward, was intrigued by her motivation and encouraged her to write up her ideas for her final class project.

  9. Progress and preservation: the temporality of a demolition hearing in Detroit

    James Macmillen, assistant professor of urban planning at the University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning and a postdoctoral fellow in the Michigan Society of Fellows, is the featured speaker in this Detroit School Series talk.